June 11 2018

By: Jackie Hook
Sunday, June 10, 2018

As we continue with our theme of The Artistry of Grief, below are some reasons why creative expression is healing:

  • Creative expression is engaging
    ​Positive Psychologist Martin Seligman suggests that one of the five core elements of psychological well-being is engagement.  Engagement refers to participating in activities that you enjoy and which challenge and excite you. You may find that when you engage in these activities you feel fully present, immersed, and that time seems to fly by.

    We love this concept, because it gives you a reason to do the things you love.  Of course the activities you find engaging depend entirely upon your unique preferences, but many people find creative outlets (both new and old) very engaging.

     
  • Creativity can lead to creative problem solving
    When faced with problems and hardship, people often find themselves boxed in by perceived limitations and barriers.  In these instances creative thinking can be useful because it helps a person to think outside the box, make new connections, identify coping skills, search for new solutions, and make meaning out of their experiences.

     
  • Creativity fosters communication and connection
    Creative expression can give a voice to people who struggle to put words to their experiences. Photography, for example, allows a person to reach across the void and say, “Here, let me show you.” In this way, without even talking, two people can still connect through art and/or shared experiences. Also, even though creating art is usually a solo endeavor, people can connect over their shared artistic interests through clubs, projects, communities and classes (or eCourses!)

From: https://whatsyourgrief.com

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