October 22 2018

By: Jackie Hook
Monday, October 22, 2018

We often get caught up in our day-to-day lives and neglect thinking about legacies, including making sure our loved ones know how we feel about them. Stanford University created the Letter Project with a simple template to help you complete seven tasks of a life review, helping you find peace and letting others know what matters to you:

  1. Acknowledge the important people in your life.
  2. Remember treasured moments from your life.
  3. Apologize to those you love if you hurt them.
  4. Forgive those who love you if they have hurt you.
  5. Express your gratitude for all the love and care you have received.
  6. Tell your friends and family how much you love them.
  7. Take a moment to say “goodbye.”

For more information, click here

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